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Franciscan Seculars

St. Francis of Assisi


“I say to you, love your enemies
and pray for those who persecute you,”

  • If the other political party is your enemy, pray for them.
  • If the filth and immorality of Hollywood and the anti-christian agenda in educational institutions are your enemies then go to…
  • The Prophecies of Our Lady of Good Succcess

  •  
    The Eucharist is an “Awesome Reality”



    St. Michael the Archangel, defend us in the day of battle

    Pray the Litany for the conversion of America, Invocation I



    For the book, “Reflections of a Secular Franciscan” you can order here →→


    Bret Thoman, OFS, who has a Master’s degree in Italian, a certificate in Franciscan studies and the owner and president of St. Francis Pilgrimages, LLC. to Italy. and authors outstanding formation Articles for fraternities. Go to:


    The Words of our Holy father, Pope Francis
    Spiritual Endeavors, and other colloquies.
    Pope Francis says, “Jesus cannot be understood without his mother”





    St. Francis’ words: to all Magistrates and Consuls
    A word to our political parties from St. Paul [As best you can] Never act out of rivalry or conceit; rather, let all parties think humbly of others as superior to themselves, each of you looking to others’ interests rather than his own.
    In everything you do, act without grumbling or arguing; prove yourselves innocent and straightforward, children of God beyond reproach in the midst of a twisted and depraved generation. Philippians 2: 2-4, 14-16


     

    The Words of Saint Mother TeresaHer words: The Greatest Poverty

     



     


    Our Lady of Good Success

    Prophecies of Our Lady of Good Success About Our Times
    April 19, 2000 | TFP.org 

    During the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries, Our Lady of Good Success appeared in Quito, Ecuador to a Spanish nun whose little-known but extraordinary life has a direct connection with our days.

    The Pope’s “infallibility will be declared a dogma of Faith by the same Pope chosen to proclaim the dogma of the mystery of my Immaculate Conception. He will be persecuted and imprisoned in the Vatican through the usurpation of the Pontifical States and through the malice, envy, and avarice of an earthly monarch.”

    “Unbridled passions will give way to a total corruption of customs because Satan will reign through the Masonic sects, targeting the children in particular to insure general corruption.

    “Unhappy, the children of those times! Seldom will they receive the sacraments of Baptism and Confirmation. As for the sacrament of Penance, they will confess only while attending Catholic schools, which the devil will do his utmost to destroy by means of persons in authority.

    “The same will occur with Holy Communion. Oh, how it hurts me to tell you that there will be many and enormous public and hidden sacrileges!

    “In those times, the sacrament of Extreme Unction will be largely ignored.… Many will die without receiving it, being thereby deprived of innumerable graces, consolation, and strength in the great leap from time to eternity.

    “The sacrament of Matrimony, which symbolizes the union of Christ with the Church, will be thoroughly attacked and profaned. Masonry, then reigning, will implement iniquitous laws aimed at extinguishing this sacrament. They will make it easy for all to live in sin, thus multiplying the birth of illegitimate children without the Church’s blessing….

    “Secular education will contribute to a scarcity of priestly and religious vocations.”

    “The holy sacrament of Holy Orders will be ridiculed, oppressed, and despised, for in this both the Church and God Himself are oppressed and reviled, since He is represented by His priests.“The devil will work to persecute the ministers of the Lord in every way, working with baneful cunning to destroy the spirit of their vocation and corrupting many. Those who will thus scandalize the Christian flock will bring upon all priests the hatred of bad Christians and the enemies of the One, Holy, Roman Catholic, and Apostolic Church. This apparent triumph of Satan will cause enormous suffering to the good pastors of the Church…and to the Supreme Pastor and Vicar of Christ on earth who, a prisoner in the Vatican, will shed secret and bitter tears in the presence of God Our Lord, asking for light, sanctity, and perfection for all the clergy of the world, to whom he is King and Father.”

    Unhappy times will come wherein those who should fearlessly defend the rights of the Church will instead, blinded despite the light, give their hand to the Church’s enemies and do their bidding. But when [evil] seems triumphant and when authority abuses its power, committing all manner of injustice and oppressing the weak, their ruin shall be near. They will fall and crash to the ground.

    “Then will the Church, joyful and triumphant like a young girl, reawaken and be comfortably cradled in the arms of my most dear and elect son of those times. If he lends an ear to the inspirations of grace–one of which will be the reading of these great mercies that my Son and I have had toward you–we shall fill him with graces and very special gifts and will make him great on earth and much greater in Heaven. There we have reserved a precious seat for him because, heedless of men, he will have fought for truth and ceaselessly defended the rights of the Church, deserving to be called ‘martyr.’”

    “At the end of the nineteenth century and throughout a great part of the twentieth, many heresies will be propagated in these lands.…

    “The small number of souls who will secretly safeguard the treasure of Faith and virtues will suffer a cruel, unspeakable, and long martyrdom. Many will descend to their graves through the violence of suffering and will be counted among the martyrs who sacrificed themselves for the country and the Church.

    “To be delivered from the slavery of these heresies, those whom the merciful love of my Son has destined for this restoration will need great will-power, perseverance, courage, and confidence in God. To try the faith and trust of these just ones, there will be times when all will seem lost and paralyzed. It will then be the happy beginning of the complete restoration….

    “In those times the atmosphere will be saturated with the spirit of impurity which, like a filthy sea, will engulf the streets and public places with incredible license.… Innocence will scarcely be found in children, or modesty in women.

    “He who should speak seasonably will remain silent.

    “There shall be scarcely any virgin souls in the world. The delicate flower of virginity will seek refuge in the cloisters.…Without virginity, fire from heaven will be needed to purify these lands.
    “Sects, having permeated all social classes, will find ways of introducing themselves into the very heart of homes to corrupt the innocence of children. The children’s hearts will be dainty morsels to regale the devil.…

    “Religious communities will remain to sustain the Church and work with courage for the salvation of souls.… The secular clergy will fall far short of what is expected of them because they will not pursue their sacred duty. Losing the divine compass, they will stray from the way of priestly ministry mapped out for them by God and will become devoted to money, seeking it too earnestly.

    “Pray constantly, implore tirelessly, and weep bitter tears in the seclusion of your heart, beseeching the Eucharistic Heart of my most holy Son to take pity on His ministers and to end as soon as possible these unhappy times by sending to His Church the Prelate who shall restore the spirit of her priests.”

    John Dewey Destroyed the Souls of Our Children

    Tradition, Family, Property – TFP
    How John Dewey Destroyed the Souls of Our Children
    February 19, 2018 | Edwin Benson 

    The story of American public education begins with Horace Mann. It was Mann who popularized the idea that American schools should teach all students, be non-sectarian, and tax-supported. A little less than a half-century passed between Mann’s death and the advent of John Dewey.

    That half-century may well be the most dynamic period of American History. In Horace Mann’s world, schools were small, scattered, and teachers had to teach a small number of widely-varied students in one-room schoolhouses. By 1900, there were still many rural schools, but the United States was quickly becoming an urban nation. Whether attracted to city lights or forced out by crippling debts, many farmers were moving to the cities. Once there, they mixed with immigrants sweeping into the nation. In some ways, city life was more convenient—and certainly more entertaining. But urban life was also more dangerous and demanded skills that the schoolmarm could not teach in her one-room school.

    To respond to those changes a political movement grew. The historian’s shorthand term for this movement is progressivism. If Horace Mann set out education’s goals, then John Dewey provided the progressive methodology. The following comes from an admirer and contemporary of Dewey’s:

    The foremost interpreter, in educational terms, of the great social and industrial changes through which we have passed, and the one who has done more since 1895 to think out and state for us an educational philosophy suited to the changing conditions in our national life, is John Dewey…. Believing that the public school is the chief remedy for the ills of society, he has tried to change the work of the school so as to make it a miniature of society itself.1

    Dewey was prolific, having written or collaborated in the writing of more than thirty books from 1887 to 1949, as well as myriad articles. That output, plus the obtuse nature of Dewey’s writing style, makes it difficult to briefly sum up his thoughts. What follows will be a capsule view of a complex philosophy.

    Dewey’s overall position is sometimes called Pragmatism, holding that knowledge arises through, “an active adaptation of the human organism to its environment.”2 Knowledge and truth are discovered by the student instead of being imparted by the teacher. Truth changes according to changing circumstances. Success lies not in knowing the tried-and-true lessons of life but in the ability to adapt by discarding outworn ideas and embracing new standards.

    According to Dewey, traditional schools inculcated obedience, which he argued was a ‘negative virtue,’ inconsistent with democratic society. Lecture and rote-learning produced students that were docile, unquestioning, and likely to submit to authority.

    Dewey held that:
    In addition to factual material, schools should promote:➧ Physical and mental activity, including play
➧ Contact with nature
➧ Development of one’s ability to express oneself and understand others
    Within the school, children should:➧ Actively work rather than passively listen
➧ Learn about life by doing
➧ Develop attitudes of co-operation and responsibility
➧ Develop the ability to use tools, both manual and mental
➧ Grow in originality and initiative
➧ Help to govern the school

    Here can be seen many aspects of modern school life. Physical education, field trips, student councils, team sports, and a focus on problem solving all derive from the musings of John Dewey. Dewey’s dismissal of traditional morality can be seen in many places in his writing, as when he stated, “Morals that professedly neglect human nature end by emphasizing those qualities of human nature that are most commonplace and average; they exaggerate the herd instinct to conformity.”3

    However, in other writings, Dewey was less critical of the herd. Like most progressives, he had a deep distrust of the value of the individual:

    Individuals are led to concentrate in moral introspection upon their own vices and virtues, and to neglect the character of the environment.… Let us perfect ourselves within, and in due season changes in society will come of themselves is the teaching. And while saints are engaged in introspection, burly sinners run the world.4

    For Dewey, the drive toward the collective was virtually automatic. The young needed to be able to live and function in a world that was not primarily composed of individuals:
    Society is the process of associating in such ways that experiences, ideas, emotions, values are transmitted and made common. To this active process, both the individual and the institutionally organized may truly be said to be subordinate.5

    An example of the practical effects of this philosophy is the emphasis on having students work in groups.

    Under Dewey’s leadership, Columbia’s Teachers’ College became the premier school of education in the United States. Its graduates fanned out to other universities. By the time of his death in 1952, Dewey was roundly acknowledged to be the most influential American educator.

    6 Dewey’s influence only grew after his death. For decades, his methods were applied in large urban school districts, but seldom in rural ones. Smaller school districts, with fewer resources and a ‘spare the rod, spoil the child’ attitude, often scoffed at Dewey’s progressive methods.
    The Impact of Religion on Education

    By the 1960s, that had changed. Better transportation made it possible for several rural schools to consolidate. Many of those newly consolidated districts were suburban. Modern suburbanites demanded schools that employed progressive methods. By 1970, it was safe to say that every certified teacher had been trained by the disciples of John Dewey.

    If Dewey’s theories had been accurate, it should have been the beginning of a bright new age of understanding. Instead, the world of the young has become uglier and increasingly self-centered.

    What really happens when you couple Dewey’s pragmatic and collectivist ideas with the value neutrality that grew out of Mann’s non-sectarianism? The product is a philosophy that sees the student as merely an animal who functions in a kind of stimulus/response/adaptation cycle. Education is tedious because its utilitarian nature subverts development of the ability to see the beauty that underlies much literature, history, and the natural sciences. At the same time, its collective nature devalues them as individuals. Their souls deadened, students see only an ugly world—one which they do not care to understand.

    Progressive education has ultimately failed because its premises are anti-human. Mann’s and Dewey’s ideologies must bear much of the responsibility for the deplorable state of American public education.

    CBC: Ideology of the European Union

    Why is a Catholic bishops’ conference cheerleading for the European Union?
    Pray for our bishops
    By Phil Lawler, | May 09, 2017, CatholicCulture.org

    Yesterday in this space I remarked on the unsustainable ideology of the European Union, which invents new “human rights” on a regular basis, without recognizing any corresponding duties. Just for example, the European Commission recently promulgated a Pillar of Social Rights, explaining that the purpose of this instrument was “delivering new and more effective rights for citizens, based upon 20 key principles.”

    The language of the announcement sounds suspiciously similar to an advertisement for a “new and more effective” laundry detergent, and the promises implied are just as difficult to pin down. If these rights truly are “new,” who created them? Rights, by themselves, cannot be “more effective;” someone must guarantee them. So who is the guarantor, and what is the nature of the guarantee? For that matter, how does a “social” right differ from other rights?

    The European Pillar of Social Rights raises more questions than it answers. And since, as a general rule, prelates should avoid political questions, it would be prudent for European bishops to let this announcement pass without notice. But the Commission of the Bishops’ Conferences of the European Community (COMECE), rushed in, where angels fear to tread. COMECE welcomed the Pillar of Social Rights as “an important step toward the European treaties’ objective of a social market economy.”

    Why? Why did COMECE feel obliged to say anything at all about this document? Why does COMECE act as a cheerleader for the European Union? Come to think of it, why does COMECE exist, in addition to the episcopal conferences of each of the EU nations?

    And what are these “social rights” that COMECE has endorsed? Some are laudable in principle, but difficult to vindicate:

    Children have the right to protection from poverty. Children from disadvantaged backgrounds have the right to specific measures to enhance equal opportunities.
    Everyone lacking sufficient resources has the right to adequate minimum income benefits ensuring a life in dignity at all stages of life, and effective access to enabling goods and services.
    So the European Commission has now made a commitment to the abolition of poverty. So does that imply a much more productive economy, with everyone working harder to raise standards of living? Not quite.

    Parents and people with caring responsibilities have the right to suitable leave, flexible working arrangements and access to care services. Women and men shall have equal access to special leaves of absence in order to fulfil their caring responsibilities and be encouraged to use them in a balanced way.
    And then some parts of the Pillar are downright dangerous:

    Regardless of gender, racial or ethnic origin, religion or belief, disability, age or sexual orientation, everyone has the right to equal treatment and opportunities regarding employment, social protection, education, and access to goods and services available to the public.
    It’s only a matter of time before aggrieved European citizens, citing the Pillar of Social Rights, will demand sanctions against Catholic institutions that do not employ homosexuals, or ordain women, or agree to alter the gender on a baptismal certificate. By praising the Pillar, COMECE has put those Catholic institutions at risk. And for what?

    Phil Lawler has been a Catholic journalist for more than 30 years. He has edited several Catholic magazines and written eight books. Founder of Catholic World News, he is the news director and lead analyst at CatholicCulture.org. See full bio.

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    Hide Comments
    Posted by: rickt26170 – May. 30, 2017 5:42 PM ET USA
    This is the land of Marx, Kasper and Danneels: they and all too many like them have helped do serious damage to the Church in Europe. We must pray that the Vatican does not listen to any of them because their road leads to religious ruin. But I fear that the Vatican does.

    Posted by: Thomas429 – May. 12, 2017 2:45 AM ET USA
    It is worse than that. They speak in oxymorons. It may not be on a list of glaring ones but “a social market economy” is definitely one.

    Posted by: Philopus – May. 10, 2017 11:13 AM ET USA
    Things could be worse; how it is that these bishops have not formed a similar group for the UN (COMWCE – Commission of the Bishops’ Conferences of the World Community)? Just think what they could condone? How much more of the church’s responsibility they could transfer to the state?

    Eucharist, awesome reality

    Shrewsbury, England, Feb 27, 2018 / 01:00 pm (CNA/EWTN News).- In a recent pastoral letter, a British bishop has encouraged Catholics to make the “awesome reality” of the Eucharist a central focus of their life and prayer during Lent.

    “In this Eucharistic Year for the Diocese I am inviting us all to reflect more deeply on the mystery and reality of the Eucharist,” wrote Bishop Mark Davies of the Diocese of Shrewsbury.

    “At the beginning of Lent, I want to draw your gaze especially towards the Altar where Christ’s Sacrifice, by which He loved us to the end, is made present anew,” Davies continued, drawing attention to the sacrifice of the Mass.

    Davies cited Vatican II’s Sacrosanctum Concilium, explaining that the sacrifice of the Mass was instituted by Christ on the night before he died to “perpetuate the sacrifice of the Cross throughout the ages until he should come again.”

    Davies said that Christ makes himself “wholly and entirely present” in the Eucharist during the Mass, evoking “the very words of institution, ‘This is my Body given for you,’ and ‘this chalice which is poured out for you is the New Covenant in my Blood.”

    While during the Mass the “central event of salvation becomes really present,” Davies asked whether Catholics “have allowed the Mass to become reduced in our minds to merely a communal meal and celebration rather than the paschal banquet, the supper of the Lamb of God sacrificed for us?”

    “Have we thereby allowed new generations to become bored and uninterested in the Mass, by not allowing them to glimpse the awesome reality of this Sacrifice and Sacrament?” Davies asked.

    The UK bishop evoked the words of Pope St. John Paul II, who said that the Eucharist displays a love which “knows no measure.”

    “How, then, could our hearts ever remain unmoved by this love beyond all others?” Davies questioned.

    “At the Altar, we learn love and sacrifice not only by imitation, but we receive the grace and power to live sacrificial lives in the service of Christ and one another in all of the spiritual and corporal works of mercy,” he continued.

    Davies encouraged the faithful in his diocese to spend time meditating on the mystery of the Eucharist, especially during the sacrificial season of Lent, so as to grow in wonder at its beauty.

    “In Lent, we think of the many sacrifices we are called to make,” Davies said.

    “In turning our gaze towards the Altar and the Cross, let us pray that we may recognize with faith and ever growing wonder the Holy Sacrifice of the Mass.”

    The Eucharist

    Make the Eucharist an awesome reality in your life.
    Shrewsbury, England, Feb 27, 2018 / 01:00 pm (CNA/EWTN News).- In a recent pastoral letter, a British bishop has encouraged Catholics to make the “awesome reality” of the Eucharist a central focus of their life and prayer during Lent.

    “In this Eucharistic Year for the Diocese I am inviting us all to reflect more deeply on the mystery and reality of the Eucharist,” wrote Bishop Mark Davies of the Diocese of Shrewsbury.

    “At the beginning of Lent, I want to draw your gaze especially towards the Altar where Christ’s Sacrifice, by which He loved us to the end, is made present anew,” Davies continued, drawing attention to the sacrifice of the Mass.

    Davies cited Vatican II’s Sacrosanctum Concilium, explaining that the sacrifice of the Mass was instituted by Christ on the night before he died to “perpetuate the sacrifice of the Cross throughout the ages until he should come again.”

    Davies said that Christ makes himself “wholly and entirely present” in the Eucharist during the Mass, evoking “the very words of institution, ‘This is my Body given for you,’ and ‘this chalice which is poured out for you is the New Covenant in my Blood.”

    While during the Mass the “central event of salvation becomes really present,” Davies asked whether Catholics “have allowed the Mass to become reduced in our minds to merely a communal meal and celebration rather than the paschal banquet, the supper of the Lamb of God sacrificed for us?”

    “Have we thereby allowed new generations to become bored and uninterested in the Mass, by not allowing them to glimpse the awesome reality of this Sacrifice and Sacrament?” Davies asked.

    The UK bishop evoked the words of Pope St. John Paul II, who said that the Eucharist displays a love which “knows no measure.”

    “How, then, could our hearts ever remain unmoved by this love beyond all others?” Davies questioned.

    “At the Altar, we learn love and sacrifice not only by imitation, but we receive the grace and power to live sacrificial lives in the service of Christ and one another in all of the spiritual and corporal works of mercy,” he continued.

    Davies encouraged the faithful in his diocese to spend time meditating on the mystery of the Eucharist, especially during the sacrificial season of Lent, so as to grow in wonder at its beauty.

    “In Lent, we think of the many sacrifices we are called to make,” Davies said.

    “In turning our gaze towards the Altar and the Cross, let us pray that we may recognize with faith and ever growing wonder the Holy Sacrifice of the Mass.”