Category Archives: Church History

Catholic Eye-opener

A Charity Hospital run by the Sisters of Charity in New Orleans, along with the Upjohn company developed the plasma system in the 1930’s that saved so many lives in WWII, Korea, Vietnam and in the middle east now.
 
During the Civil War most of the  nurses were nuns.
 
Even if you are not Catholic, this is eye opening:
 
When the Catholic Church was founded, there were no hospitals.  Today, one out of five people in this country receive their medical care at a Catholic hospital.
 
When the Catholic Church was founded, there were no schools.  Today, the Catholic Church teaches 3 million students a day, in its more than 250 Catholic Colleges and Universities, in its more than 1200 Catholic High Schools and its more than 5000 Catholic grade schools.
 
Every day, the Catholic Church feeds, clothes, shelters and educates more people than any other organization in the world.
 
The new Obama  Health Mandate could end all this and the tax payers would have to make up the loss.
 
Also, all Catholic adoption services will come to an end… a human disaster.
 
There are more than 77 million Catholics in this country.  It takes an estimated 50 million Catholic votes to elect a president.
 
I am asking all of you to go to the polls in 2016 and be united in replacing all Senators and Reps with someone who will respect the Catholic Church, all Christians, and all Religions.
 
Mr. President, you said, “The USA  is not a Christian Nation”.  You are wrong – we are a Christian Nation founded on Judeo-Christian values allowing all religions in America to worship and practice freely… something that Islam will never do.
 
Oh, by the way, on MUSLIM HERITAGE IN America… Have you ever been to a Muslim hospital, heard a Muslim orchestra, seen a Muslim band march in a parade, know of a Muslim charity, ever seen Muslims shaking hands with a Muslim Girl Scout, or ever seen a Muslim Candy Striper volunteering in a hospital?
 
Have you ever seen a Muslim do much of anything that contributes positively to the American way of life?
 
One more note… in every church or synagogue I have ever been in in the United States, I have always seen an American flag.  No mosques in the United States carries an American flag.

How beer saved the world

[One Way, for there were many.] by Deacon Dennis
Good Morning, good people!

May the Lord give you His Peace!

Today I send along a site that reinforces the contention that beer saved the World, or at least Western Civilization during the Middle Ages, and that the Monks were the ones who saved Western Civilization by producing and selling their beer.

As populations began to migrate to ever larger cities and towns during this time, sewage disposal became simply a matter of throwing food waste and night soil wastes into the streets which washed into the rivers and streams.  This was fine if you lived upstream, but if you lived downstream in the next town, water was not the healthiest thing you could drink.  As the article points out, “Beer production served other purposes too. The Rule outlines the monastery’s obligation to show hospitality to travelers and pilgrims. Beer was safer to drink in medieval times than water contaminated by sewage, and therefore was served to visitors.”

The YouTube video attached to the article entitled “Beer Brewing Monks Celebrate 1 Year of Production” documents the Benedictine monks in Norcia, Italy, celebrating their first year of beer production,

You can  find a Discovery Channel Documentary, “How Beer Saved the World” (2011) on Netflix that traces the origins of beer and devotes considerable time to the contention that it was indeed the monks who save Western Civilization through their production of and selling of beer.  The writers are a bit “off” on some of their notions (example – that the monks used beer to lure people to Sunday Mass by the promise of a beer-blast following the Mass) but the idea of boiling the beer mash (the grains and water) and other sanitary practices necessary to good beer production instituted by the monks did indeed prevent many water-borne diseases such as Campylobacteriosis, Cholera, E Coli Infections, Dysentery, and Typhoid Fever, just to name a few that could wipe out the major portion of the populations of those cities and towns of the time since there were no antibiotics that could combat these.  Death from untreated Cholera, for example, is within 10-18 hours from the onset of symptoms (profuse diarrhea and vomiting) especially among the youngest and weakest.

Some Trappist Beers at a store devoted to craft beers here in Warner Robins and Chimay in our local Kroger.

The failure of history without Christ

Flag with cross

Flag with cross

On the failure of history—and historians—without Christ
By Dr. Jeff Mirus, Jan 29, 2015

Your Editor’s note: Our country’s beginning was framed with God and His Son in mind.

When I was a brash young graduate student in the very early 1970s, Professor Lawrence Stone tried to teach me that the English Revolution and civil war were essentially caused by social and demographic factors, and that the previous emphasis on religious differences was essentially laughable. I remember telling him, with my classic humility, that he had the cart before the horse. (Extaordinarly witty, no? But it is deceptively easy to draw down on a professor when you’re 22, you’ve been admitted to the Ivy League, and you already know everything.)

It so happened that Professor Stone did not like my attention to religious beliefs as historical motivators, and so he did what any open-minded sceptic would do: He tried to get my fellowship revoked so I could not continue to study at Princeton. Amazingly, this turned out to be a violation of the rules as long as my grades were good. But it also taught me a significant lesson about how academic reputations are made (usually by attacking someone else’s theory) and retained (usually by advancing students who have become your clones). Read More

Oldest known copy of one of the Gospels.

Archeologists are expecting the publication of what could be the oldest known copy of one of the Gospels.
The fragmentary text, taken from the Gospel of St. Mark, was reportedly discovered on a sheet of papyrus that was used for a mummy. Experts believe that the text dates back to the 1st century.
The discovery of the Gospel text has been surrounded by mystery because some scientists object to the process in which papyrus is removed from a mummy’s mask, thereby destroying the mask itself.

Go to: http://www.livescience.com/49489-oldest-known-gospel-mummy-mask.html

Mummy Mask May Reveal Oldest Known Gospel

1st-century Gospel text found in mummy’s mask?

This mummy mask was one of the masks that the researchers took apart to reveal ancient papyri. This mummy mask is similar to the one that contained the first century gospel fragment.
Credit: Courtesy of Prof. Craig Evans

A text that may be the oldest copy of a gospel known to exist — a fragment of the Gospel of Mark that was written during the first century, before the year 90 — is set to be published.

At present, the oldest surviving copies of the gospel texts date to the second century (the years 101 to 200).

This first-century gospel fragment was written on a sheet of papyrus that was later reused to create a mask that was worn by a mummy. Although the mummies of Egyptian pharaohs wore masks made of gold, ordinary people had to settle for masks made out of papyrus (or linen), paint and glue. Given how expensive papyrus was, people often had to reuse sheets that already had writing on them. 

In recent years scientists have developed a technique that allows the glue of mummy masks to be undone without harming the ink on the paper. The text on the sheets can then be read.

The first-century gospel is one of hundreds of new texts that a team of about three-dozen scientists and scholars is working to uncover, and analyze, by using this technique of ungluing the masks, said Craig Evans, a professor of New Testament studies at Acadia Divinity College in Wolfville, Nova Scotia.

“We’re recovering ancient documents from the first, second and third centuries. Not just Christian documents, not just biblical documents, but classical Greek texts, business papers, various mundane papers, personal letters,” Evans told Live Science. The documents include philosophical texts and copies of stories by the Greek poet Homer. [See Images of Early Christian Inscriptions and Artifacts]

The business and personal letters sometimes have dates on them, he said. When the glue was dissolved, the researchers dated the first-century gospel in part by analyzing the other documents found in the same mask.

One drawback to the process is that the mummy mask is destroyed, and so scholars in the field are debating whether that particular method should be used to reveal the texts they contain.

But Evans emphasized that the masks that are being destroyed to reveal the new texts are not high quality ones that would be displayed in a museum. Some are not masks at all but are simply pieces of cartonnage.

Evans told Live Science, “We’re not talking about the destruction of any museum-quality piece.”

The technique is bringing many new texts to light, Evans noted. “From a single mask, it’s not strange to recover a couple dozen or even more” new texts, he told Live Science. “We’re going to end up with many hundreds of papyri when the work is done, if not thousands.”

Debate

Scholars who work on the project have to sign a nondisclosure agreement that limits what they can say publicly. There are several reasons for this agreement. One is that some of the owners of these masks simply do not want to be made known, Evans said. “The scholars who are working on this project have to honor the request of the museums, universities, private owners, so forth.”

The owners of the mummy masks retain ownership of the papyrus sheets after the glue on them is dissolved.

Evans said that the only reason he can talk about the first-century gospel before it is published is because a member of the team leaked some of the information in 2012. Evans was careful to say that he is not telling Live Science anything about the first-century gospel that hasn’t already been leaked online.

Soon after the 2012 leak, speculation surrounded the methods that the scholars used to figure out the gospel’s age.

Evans says that the text was dated through a combination of carbon-14 dating, studying the handwriting on the fragment and studying the other documents found along with the gospel. These considerations led the researchers to conclude that the fragment was written before the year 90. With the nondisclosure agreement in place, Evans said that he can’t say much more about the text’s date until the papyrus is published.

Destruction of mummy masks

The process that is used to obtain the papyri, which involves the destruction of the mummy masks, has also generated debate. For instance, archaeologist Paul Barford, who writes about collecting and heritage issues, has written a scathing blog post criticizing the work on the gospel.

Roberta Mazza, a lecturer in Classics and Ancient History at the University of Manchester, has blogged her concerns about the text as has Brice Jones, a doctoral candidate in religion at Concordia University.

When the texts are published the debate is likely to move beyond the blogosphere and into mainstream media and scholarly journals.

Biblical clues

Although the first-century gospel fragment is small, the text will provide clues as to whether the Gospel of Mark changed over time, Evans said.

His own research is focused on analyzing the mummy mask texts, to try to determine how long people held onto them before disposing or reusing them. This can yield valuable information about how biblical texts were copied over time.

“We have every reason to believe that the original writings and their earliest copies would have been in circulation for a hundred years in most cases — in some cases much longer, even 200 years,” he said.

This means that “a scribe making a copy of a script in the third century could actually have at his disposal (the) first-century originals, or first-century copies, as well as second-century copies.”

Set to publish

Evans said that the research team will publish the first volume of texts obtained through the mummy masks and cartonnage later this year. It will include the gospel fragment that the researchers believe dates back to the first century. 

The team originally hoped the volume would be published in 2013 or 2014, but the date had to be moved back to 2015. Evans said he is uncertain why the book’s publication was delayed, but the team has made use of the extra time to conduct further studies into the first-century gospel.
“The benefit of the delay is that when it comes out, there will be additional information about it and other related texts.”

For more information on this subject go to: Catholic World News, = CatholicCulture.org =
http://www.catholicculture.org/news/headlines/index.cfm?storyid=23795